Twelve years to save the planet?

The South East England Faiths Forum (SEEF) 2019 Annual Conference took place on 16th September 2019 at the University of Surrey. Speakers from different faiths and none offered faith and belief perspectives on our common environment and responsibility for our planet.

Rabbi Alex Goldberg, Co-ordinating Chaplain, University of Surrey welcomed attendees and Kauser Akhtar, Chair of SEEF introduced the speakers.

John Paul from the Ecological Conversion Group works with the Catholic Church looking at the spiritual aspect of the ecological crisis facing our world today. In Laudato Si, Pope Francis has addressed all people about the need to seek a sustainable environment .

Buddhists’ perspective on climate change is expressed in the phrase “dependent origination”. That means, explained John Marder, Interfaith Officer for Network of Buddhist Organisations UK, that all things exist in relationship to each other. So our lack of caring and our selfishness results in global problems. We have individual responsibility to do what we can to safeguard the environment, now.

Cosmic interconnection is one of the ways in which we connect with the environment, one energy flowing through the whole the planet, one creator God in everything everywhere, so that a Sikh regards everything as holy and sacrosanct. Kamal Preet Kaur, Sikh Missionary Society spokesperson, told the conference that Sikhs were conscious of the consequences of their actions and tried to balance needs and wants.

Jeremy Rodell, Dialogue Officer Humanists UK , expressed the golden rule of treating other people as you like to be treated yourself. He found little difference between religious and non-religious views on climate change. Humanists believe that science is the best way to understand facts about the world and do not believe in any supernatural creator being. Pressure by both faith and other organisations on governments to prioritise action on climate change is useful.

Rabbi Jeffrey Newman of Finchley Reformed Synagogue asked a question : how does what you have heard make you feel? Grief, anger, despair, concern for the future …………..We are not separate from nature but part of it. What are we able to do together to effect change? Rabbi Jeffrey advocated peaceful direct action as being most effective. He recommended reading “Deep Adaptation” by Professor Jem Bendell.

There are 2 billion Muslims around the world who need to make connection with the environment. Kamran Shezad from the Islamic Foundation for Environmental and Ecological Sciences told us that the Qu’ran 40.57 taught humility, that humanity is not greater than the creation of earth and heaven. While corporates have a huge responsibility individuals also have a responsibility, for example with food, how we obtain it, what we eat.

Finally Dr Justine Huxley (CEO, St Ethelburga’s Centre for Reconciliation and Peace) talked about spiritual ecology – building a better world, and resilience, preparing for social and ecological collapse. She asked what is the spiritual opportunity in this problem? The climate change disaster could be viewed as a doorway into transformation, living the story we all want to see.

This Conference was an insight into the various ways faith, and non-faith, communities view the urgent issue of climate change. The speakers found many similarities of views and approach, albeit through different faith and non-faith lenses. All agreed that action now was needed. The Conference ended with pledges to do what we can as individuals and communities, to address climate change honestly and with hope.

http://www.se-faithforum.net

“Deep adaptation” Professor Jem Bendell https://jembendell.com

Smurf Centre in Za’atari Camp!

The Smurf Centre being constructed March 2019

At last, a much needed childcare centre opens in Za’atari Camp!

It was in the process of being built in March 2019 when I visited but thanks in part to great support from the SE Methodist District for the All We Can Syrian Refugee Appeal, the amazing sum of £4000 has been raised towards the project. And this has been doubled by a generous supporter to £8000 enabling even more resources for the centre.

All We Can’s local partner LWF built it next to their Peace Oasis and named it The Smurf Centre. It is the only place on this vast camp of 80,000 refugees that offers safe childcare with plenty of craft and educational classes, play, toys, games and a safe outdoor space. The camp is crowded and hardly any play areas exist where small children can have fun, so this is a great facility.

Za’atari Refugee Camp

Safe and secure childcare means that parents can be confident leaving their small children in the hands of trained volunteers to have a break for a few hours or even be free to work, if jobs are available. The centre itself was designed, built and painted by refugees and offers opportunities for other refugees to take up positions as teachers, helpers and security personnel.

Looking forward to going back to visit and seeing all the happy children enjoying this brilliant Smurf Centre!

Loss, pain and hope – two inspiring books

Enforced incapacity due to a broken ankle has given me the opportunity to read these two books. They are very different, but both reflect some of the deep physical, practical and emotional challenges facing those who have to flee their countries, and are intensely moving.

Friends from church gifted me “The Beekeeper of Aleppo”, a fictional account of a Syrian couple’s harrowing journey from Aleppo to the UK. Nuri is a beekeeper, and Afra his wife, an artist. They live a simple life surrounded by family and friends in the beautiful city of Aleppo until war destroys the city and their home and their son is killed. Afra loses her sight, Nuri is threatened by militia, and they have to leave. Their journey is full of danger, deprivation and fear, and the impact of their loss is profound. Yet Nuri and Afra keep going, in the hope of refuge in the UK with their beekeeper cousin Mustafa.

Although this is a novel, the author Christy Lefteri, herself the daughter of Cypriot refugees, writes with authenticity. She bases her book on her time working as a volunteer at a Unicef supported refugee centre in Athens.

This is a compelling story, delicately and compassionately told. Read it, and be ready to be deeply moved.

In contrast, “No longer strangers” is a true story. Written by a persecuted Christian, Javed Masih, he tells how he was forced to uproot his family from their home in Pakistan and seek asylum in the Netherlands. Throughout the hardships they experience, the inhumanity of the bureaucratic process, the emotional and practical issues they have to face every day, the family find inspiration and encouragement through their faith and the life and teachings of Jesus Christ.

One example of the need for hope was when Javed, his wife Nasreen and two children found themselves at a new hostel, miserably cold and hungry in a tiny cramped room and desperately missing their home. The heating didn’t work, there was no food and Nasreen was forced to beg at reception for teabags so they could make themselves a hot drink. Then Javed reminded the family of the story of the nativity, of the lack of proper shelter and care for Mary, and Joseph. Despite the hard conditions, the glory of the birth of Jesus filled Mary and Joseph with happiness and thankfulness to God. Through the retelling of this Christian narrative, Javed and his family found hope and comfort to help them in their difficult situation.

While this book is a real and uplifting testimony to the family’s Christian faith, it is also an uncompromising account of the impersonal and often uncaring asylum process. Reading it gave me a better understanding not only of the complexities faced by asylum seekers but also of the tremendous courage and tenacity any asylum seeker needs to get through it all, whilst at the same time coping with the loss of their home, former life and country and the profound loneliness of being a stranger in a foreign land.

Europe’s “welcome” to refugees and asylum seekers has not always been wholehearted. Javed’s story shows the tremendous strength it takes to cope with a different way of life, an unknown language and a cold climate and should prompt us to do all we can to help.

Shade in the sun

The sunshine is great but when it gets too hot, here in the UK we can sit in the shade of a tree to cool off. In the deseert landscapes of Jordan it’s not so easy to find shade from the burning sun, So it’s good to remember the refugees in Irbid, Jordan who have enthusiastically embraced a new project, planting a community garden. This project has involved the whole community, from the youngest to the oldest, whole families turning out to plant young eucalyptus, fig, olive and rose trees on a plot of land next to the community playground. The refugee camp is crowded, dusty with no space, so creating a tree shaded garden will give refugee families a much needed area for rest and relaxation.

The project is also teaching the refugees especially the young ones, to nurture and tend the saplings so they grow, to conserve scarce and precious water by building a reservoir, and to care for the natural world. To see everyone’s enthusiasm for this project and pride in their growing garden was heartwarming!

Project sponsored by All We Can and delivered by its local partner LWF.

World Refugee Day June 20th 2019

Singer in Za’atari Refugee Camp Jordan

Singing is therapy as well as art! I was humbled and delighted to hear these young Syrian refugees in Za’atari Refugee Camp, Jordan singing so beautifully together. Their teacher, a Syrian refugee himself, told me that they didn’t want to sing pop songs. Instead they chose to sing the traditional Syrian songs of their culture and homeland. They sang from the heart, a lament of exile like Psalm 137. Yet as well as sadness and pain, there was hope and shy pride shining through as they sang together.

These young people were being given an opportunity to express their feelings through music at The Peace Oasis, Za’atari Refugee Camp, Jordan which houses more than 80,000 Syrian refugees. Many of the families fled Syria in fear of their lives four or five years ago. Their homes and livelihoods in Syria have been destroyed by the prolonged war; parents wonder what the future holds for their children.

Since 2015 I have been visiting refugee projects in Jordan supported by All We Can (an international development and emergency relief organisation with its roots in the Methodist Church). I can testify from personal experience to the difference these projects make to the lives of refugees.

If you share my passion for this work, and want to support more young people and children by giving to All We Can, you can double your donation to the Syrian Crisis Appeal helping children in Za’atari. Thanks to a generous supporter, every £ you give will be matched by another £, up to £5000.

Go to allwecan.org.uk/refugeeweek to give online or call 0207 467 5132 and help the songs to be sung with joy! Make sure you specify the refugee appeal when you give.

Breaking the Ramadan fast

The IsIamic holy month of Ramadan ended last week. During Ramadan, Muslims do not eat or drink, not even water, from sunrise to sunset! That’s a very long time to go without food and drink – especially while still carrying on daily life. So breaking the fast at the Iftar meal at sunset is a special event.

I was honoured to be invited to share Iftar at the University of Surrey by the Muslim Chaplain Dr Husni Hammuda. The meal took place in a huge marquee and was hosted by the Surrey University Islamic Society. Hundreds of students, lecturers and guests broke their fast with dates and water before praying. Then followed a traditional meal of rice with chicken or a vegetarian option, women and men eating separately then ending with the evening prayer.

The students were in the middle of exams but most said that fasting was not difficult but concentrated the mind on revision without the distractions of mealtimes!

It was wonderful to see the friendship and sense of community among the students; the marquee was alive with chatter! I was made to feel very welcome – so hope to be invited back next year!

Update on recent visit to Jordan

Women’s refugee catering project in Irbid, Jordan

We visited some of All We Can’s projects via it’s partner organisation Lutheran World Federation (LWF) in March. Some refugee women in a refugee camp in Irbid north east Jordan have received funding to set up a catering business. They cook special meals for celebrations, parties, weddings and family events and the income from this enables them to be more independent. Also they have formed friendships which have eased loneliness and isolation which many of them were feeling as refugees.

More coming soon…

Um Abdu

This is Um Abdu (“mother of” Abdu) with two of her grandchildren. In 2015 Um Abdu and 6 other family members had to flee in fear of their lives from the war in Syria. Now they were living in a converted container in Za’atari refugee camp, northern Jordan. This is her story.

Um Abdu’s husband was a baker from Derra in Syria. Their home and business had been destroyed by bombing so the family left for the safety of neighbouring Jordan.

Life in the refugee camp was bleak. Out of the 7 family members living in the container, there was only one breadwinner, supporting parents, sister and husband and their 3 children, with another brother and sister and 2 children of a cousin orphaned when their parents were killed.

The family relied on aid for their livelihoods and were very proud of one small granddaughter who was awarded a supplementary food coupon because she was attending the school in the camp.

This family said they had no hope for the future, no possibility of finding work. They were thinking of leaving, even of going to Europe – this was the first time the aid workers had heard refugees talking of Europe, although we all know that many refugees have taken that path.

There are 80,000 refugees still living in difficult conditions in Za’atari Refugee Camp. Some of them have been there for years and have no expectations of going home. All We Can is committed to supporting these refugees, and is particularly concerned to help children and teenagers.

Children have the right to special protection and help as refugees. Give this family and others like them some hope. Double your donation to All We Can’s Refugee Appeal helping children in Za’atari. Thanks to a generous supporter the first £5000 All We Can receive will be doubled!

Give now : via the website www.allwecan.org.uk

By telephone : credit/debit card 0207467 5132

Or by post : cheque made payable to All We Can. Send to All We Can 25 Marylebone Road London NW1 5JR.